Hazel McHaffie

A bookworm’s paradise

Head in the general direction of Dumfries, then point your nose towards the Atlantic Ocean, and with luck you’ll stumble upon a tiny little place called Wigtown, population less than 900.

Small in mathematical dimensions it may be, but Wigtown punches way above its weight in other senses. In 1998, it went from a decaying backwater to become ‘Scotland’s National Book Town’ (after winning a competition against more flourishing towns such as Dunblane and Moffat), a development which acted as a catalyst for major community regeneration.

The rejuvenated and very splendid County Buildings are a monument to the drive to put this sleepy little place on the map. Supportive funding from many sources, and the sterling work of some hugely dedicated enthusiasts, have helped it go from strength to strength.

And boy, does it merit the title of National Book Town twenty years on! Why?
Big breath in …
Because …
it has a thriving annual Book Festival each September – selling in the region of 29,000 tickets this year for 290 events;
plus it masterminds several smaller, more specialist book and festive events in January, March and May and July (that I heard about – there could well be more);
plus it organises outreach literary activities for schools and prisons and care homes and budding writers;
plus it offers opportunities for members of the general public from around the world to realise their dream of running a book shop for a couple of weeks in The Open Book;
plus it currently boasts 14 independent bookshops, and a further 6 book-related businesses;
plus the largest secondhand bookshop anywhere in the country  Рa Grade II-listed Georgian building, holding upwards of 10,000 books and a mile of shelving!
And breathe out …

Quaint, pretty, picturesque, atmospheric ‘ the blurb has it, cultural gems nestling cheek by jowl with delightful little tea rooms (also full of books!), a heady mixture of old Scots common sense and farming traditions leavening the literary landscape.

Its own martyrs,

its own stone circle,
its own famous names and connections.

It’s even got a toe in nature conservation, bordered as it is by a nature reserve (which stretches all the way to Newton Stewart in the North and Creetown in the West), home to exotic species of migrant geese down in the saltmarshes; offering easily accessed bird/squirrel hides;

ospreys in the skies; wonderful forest trails a few minutes drive away.

What’s not to like?

I’ve just spent a couple of days there lapping up all the literary references and browsing and exploring. What a treat. Even in November. This tiny town nestling at the remote edge of a vast pastoral county is thriving to such an extent that most of the shops and cafes stay open all year round.

During the September Festival this year – its 20th anniversary – the town was spectacularly decorated with special outdoor wallpaper designed by artist Astrid Jaekel under the theme: If these walls could talk. Each set of drawings illustrated a unique part of that particular building’s history. Some of it is still in situ, so I could see why unsuspecting drivers almost collided with each other when they encountered it initially; ‘striking’ doesn’t do it justice.

You might have noticed that, at the beginning of this month, The Royal Society for Public Health produced a report: Health on the High Street: Running on Empty. It found that ‘unhealthy’ high streets could be taking up to two and a half years off people’s lives. Unhealthy = full of bookmakers and off-licences (points also deducted for payday lenders, fast food outlets, tanning salons, empty shops); healthy = libraries and pharmacies (bonus points also for dentists, opticians, coffee shops, museums and galleries). Yep, I think we can see an inherent weighting here! Anyway … overall our beautiful city, Edinburgh, came top of the health stakes. But, you know what? I reckon Wigtown would be up there in the big league if it were scored. It’s a tonic of a town.

I loved it. And I plan to take you inside some of these fascinating bookshops next week to share my experience of browsing and buying there.

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