Hazel McHaffie

A sabbatical?

My enforced inactivity continues as doctors try to find out why my heart is doing crazy things. Those who know me best recognise the potential frustration for someone used to living life at a hundred miles an hour, and they’ve been kindly plying me with distractions of various kinds, helping to keep me sane and functioning at some level.

West Wing DVDs

So, for example, a complete boxed set of the drama West Wing has kept me sitting down for countless hours. Plus it’s given me a new perspective on life at the top of politics in a country the size and structure of the USA. But it also includes fascinating glimpses into the world of … medical ethics no less! Everything from: should a president reveal that he has Multiple Sclerosis and is experiencing lapses in concentration? and should his doctor wife be allowed to treat him secretly? … to: what use could be made of evidence that praying for patients’ recovery influences outcomes? Issues of infant mortality, postcode lottery in medicine, autonomy and Alzheimer’s, confidentiality, jumping the queue for organ donation, medical capacity, assisted dying, mind control experimentation … they all become useful material in the hands of a skilled scriptwriter. This particular programme doesn’t follow through any of these issues as I would, (it makes no claim to do so) but that in itself is thought provoking.

Val McDermidWhen the dizzyness prevents me sitting up and watching a film, listening to something interesting beats lying idle feeling every erratic heartbeat. Radio 4’s Book of the Week last week was Val McDermid‘s Forensics: the Anatomy of Crime about which I wrote a couple of blog posts ago. Val herself reads this abridged version of her book and gives a fascinating glimpse into the way that the dead and the scenes of crimes speak. She takes the listener into houses devastated by fire or a shooting; she peers at the insects and poisons which tell their own story; she traces the life of history’s most prolific female serial killer, and the Sausage King of Chicago who tried to dispose of his wife’s body in the processing plant, as well as appalling miscarriages of justice. Snippets that really whet the appetite for more. And all told in her distinctive Scots voice.  Once again I’m hugely impressed by the depths to which this bestselling crime writer goes in order to authenticate her plots and the sheer scope of her knowledge. (Hurry if you want to hear these 15 minute excerpts – they’ll soon be unavailable.)

So this month of illness might well have wiped my diary free of appointments and activities but I’ve been learning valuable lessons: the art of simply being still, to value thinking, to make the best of my limited abilities. And hardest of all: patience. Maybe I should simply reconstruct the events of the last four weeks as a sabbatical as advocated in these tips for creative thinking.

 

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