Hazel McHaffie

Challenges and choices

The International Arts Festival is currently in full swing in our fair city, and it’s easy to get caught up in the exciting momentum of events and performances. Guilty as charged.

But of course, for many, far far more serious questions beset them than which actors, writers, musicians or artistes to support. I currently have six special people on my worry/prayer list all facing major challenges in relation to their health, life and death.

It’s not appropriate to be specific about them, but perhaps they are behind my extra sensitivity to the difficult choices so many face. For this post I’m thinking of those people who’re involved in the consequences of legal change, medical advances or financial restrictions associated with healthcare – my kind of workaday world. I’ll enumerate but a few (with links) reported in the national press in just 36 hours by way of illustration. All raise a number of thorny issues and I leave you to ponder those for yourself.

Relatives and health care workers caring for patients trapped in unresponsive bodies with minimal or no consciousness no longer need to go to court to resolve the question of withdrawing/withholding life sustaining measures. Decisions about dignified death can be made quietly and privately in a timeous way.

In figures released last month, the first trial of a pioneering immunology vaccine called DCVax has shown some real promise. DCVax essentially uses the patient’s own immune system to fight the tumour, tailoring treatment to their specific needs. This trial has already been running for 11 years and came to public attention when MP Dame Tessa Jowell was not eligible to receive DCVax for her glioblastoma. Sadly she died in May, but not before she had successfully campaigned for increased funding for brain cancer research. To date patients have needed to stump up £200,000 for this treatment.

New National Guidelines, known as Saving Babies’ Lives Care Bundle, have been issued in response to the alarming statistic that 600 babies could be saved from stillbirth annually if the mothers were adequately monitored.  SBLCB focuses in on the incidence of smoking, signs of failure to grow, reduced fetal movement, inadequate monitoring in labour – risk factors that were all known about decades ago when I was in clinical practice. Given that 3000 babies are stillborn every year in England alone this seems like an important area to concentrate on.

ASDA has apologised for selling a pregnancy test that issued false results leading a young woman in Devon to believe she was pregnant when she wasn’t. However the store has not recalled this product and insist it has been quality tested.

One in five people who have eating disorders have their lives cut short, but a considerable number are turned away from help because they are not skinny enough. And this in spite of National Institute of Health and Care Excellence guidance to disregard body mass index. (I found this to be true when I was researching Inside of Me.) A campaign is now underway to ensure the NICE guidelines are being adhered to.

News at the end of July was that more than half of Scotland’s population have pledged to donate their organs and/or tissues after death. That’s the highest rate in the UK and comes after a high profile awareness campaign. It’s good news for the 550 or so waiting for transplants and a significant factor in the discussion about whether we should change to an opt-out system, currently under review. Interestingly 90% of the population support organ donation, so one wonders about the mismatch.

I could go on but I promised just a brief snapshot. But I’m doing my best to keep perspective during my annual summer sortie into the world of drama and art.

 

 

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