Hazel McHaffie

The price of everything … the value of nothing

So, that’s the Festival over for another year. Phew! Time now to settle down to the day job. But also to pause for a moment and reflect. All the talent, creativity, determination I’ve seen in these many and varied performances and exhibitions make me question: where do I fit in the bigger scale of things? How can I as a writer do better?

It took a cashier to rapidly reduce me to my proper size.

Me (enter stage left into local post office, carrying one of own books for sending to a reviewer.)

Cashier (without looking up; tone bored): ‘Where’s it going?’

Me: ‘To England.’

Cashier: ‘What’s in it?’

Me: ‘A book.’

Cashier (dismissively):  ‘So nothing of any value.’

Me (tentatively): ‘Well, the book’s priced at £7.99 …’

Cashier (fingers impatiently hovering over till): ‘First or Second Class?’

Beneath his plimsoll line evidently.

Reminded me of Lord Darlington in Oscar Wilde‘s play, Lady Windemere’s Fan, who quipped that a cynic was ‘a man who knows the price of everything and the value of nothing‘. Typical of Wilde, not just a memorable turn of phrase, but also touching on a problem at the heart of society. (Hey, did you know Wilde’s full name was Oscar Fingal O’Flahertie Wills Wilde? Now there’s an aside to conjure with.)

It also got me thinking. What would you get for £7.99 nowadays?

A budget quickie lunch in town?

A concession ticket to an Edinburgh Fringe Festival show?

A month of flexible prime membership with Amazon?

A modest hanging basket?

A pack of men’s socks?

Hey ho.

Jean-Claude Juncker, President of the European Commission, could teach that postal worker a thing or two:

As the world goes digital, we also have to empower our artists and creators and protect their works. Artists and creators are our crown jewels. The creation of content is not a hobby. It is a profession. And it is part of our European culture.

YES!!

Enthusiasm rekindled. Onwards and upwards. Starting with a quick revision of the basics courtesy of literary agent Evan Marshall‘s book, Novel Writing, to get me back in the zone … well, it does say ‘16 Steps to Success’ in the subtitle!

And hey, before I’ve reached the end of the first ten pages I’m already feeling more relaxed. Be realistic, Marshall cautions, set achievable goals … factor in your own resources, responsibilities and limitations … have the self-confidence and self possession and self esteem to define for yourself what your personal definition of success should be; what will bring fulfillment and satisfaction and serenity. Wise words. So it’s all down to me then to decide what success means to me.

 

 

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