Hazel McHaffie

David Cameron

A time for giving

Christmas. Time to make contact. Time to appreciate friends. Time to give gifts. Time for a little gentle reflection …

You’ve probably seen the posters:

Comparing what the season means to us here in the fifth richest country, (foreign visitors please substitute your own ranking), with what it will bring for those people caught up in world conflicts and humanitarian crises, it’s all too easy to sink beneath a burden of injustice, maybe even guilt, isn’t it? We see the horrors everyday on our screens, in our papers; our contributions feel all too meagre. Today, however, I don’t want to dwell on the depressing aspects of our global inequalities, rather I want to send out a positive message.

Let’s go back to the beginning of my thinking … I read somewhere (can’t now remember where) that David Cameron is charging £120,000 per hour to give talks about Brexit. That’s £2,000 per minute. Hello? He was only getting £143,462 per annum when he was running the country! – OK, I know, I know, that was his basic salary; he had sundry other substantial incomes alongside that. And don’t get me started on the obscene salaries sportspeople earn rake in, or models, or … Yes, yes, you get the picture.

Instead, let’s turn to face in another direction, and consider the unsung heroes in our society; contrast their incomes with £2,000 per minute.
The average wage for a carer patiently looking after our elderly and demented relatives, is £7.25 an hour.
A school teacher educating our precious children gets a starting salary of £19,600.
A qualified nurse with our lives in her hands can expect to take home £21,692 a year at the start of her career.
A fully competent trained fireman putting his own life on the line will get £29,345.
I could go on.

They aren’t on the front cover of glossy magazines, they aren’t being pursued by the paparazzi for celebrity shots, they aren’t winning Nobel prizes, they aren’t wowing us with their luxury homes/yachts/cars/handbags/jewels, they aren’t attracting mega bucks. No, but they are helping to create/preserve the caring society I want for my children and grandchildren. They are making the world a better place. Indeed many of them will be looking after our relatives and friends instead of being at home with their own loved ones this Christmas. I’ve spent most of my life surrounded by such people, ordinary folk doing extraordinary things, and I see at first hand the extra miles they go, the difference they make, the quiet satisfaction they get from a job well done. I want to take this opportunity to comprehensively salute them all and wish them joy and contentment, not just at this festive time, but every day.

As Tiny Tim would say, ‘God bless them, every one!’

Let’s all resolve in the coming year to truly value excellence, dedication, selflessness and service.

 

 

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A legal blunderbuss

Ashya King is five years old. He’s recently had a cancerous tumour removed from his brain – two major surgeries within a month, in fact. If ever a kiddie needed his mum it’s this one. So how come the authorities thought it appropriate to clap his parents, Naghemeh and Brett, in jail hundreds of miles away from their little boy, in a foreign country where he’d be surrounded by strangers speaking Spanish?

Headline: the searchAccording to media reports, the Kents removed Ashya from Southampton General Hospital without medical consent, thereby jeopardising his life. The father claims he told staff he would be taking his son abroad for a treatment he considered less dangerous than the options they advocated. The family then travelled to Malaga to sell a holiday property to pay privately for a relatively new treatment, proton beam radiotherapy (PBT), in Prague, which the doctors in Southampton had declined to sanction. Hampshire Police issued an international arrest warrant on the grounds of suspected child neglect.

When they were tracked down in Spain the parents were held in custody in a high-security prison in Madrid, Ashya was made a ward of court, police were posted outside his hospital room, his six siblings were denied entry. Can you picture the effect of all this on a desperately ill child said to be unable to speak, eat or drink unaided?

Headline - family bannedCritics have been vociferous – understandably. Words like ‘draconian’, ‘inhumane’, ‘barbaric’, ‘heavy-handed’ abound. The injustice seemed particularly disproportionate when the country is still reeling from the news that the authorities failed hundreds of children in Rotherham who really were abused over a 16 year period. Huge numbers (over 200,000) signed a petition which went to Downing Street.

Headliine - reunitedThen suddenly the authorities did an about-turn, though not before the Kings had been separated from Ashya by 300 miles and several days. David Cameron, recalling the struggles he faced with his own severely disabled son, Ivan, called for ‘an outbreak of common sense’. The Health Secretary offered to fly out an independent oncologist to help advise the parents on the best course of action. Procedures were fast-tracked. This whole fiasco was put down to a breakdown in communication compounded by an over-zealous application of the law.

Headline - accepted in PragueThen came an emergency hearing via a telephone conference; the Kings – once again his legal guardians – were given permission by a judge to fly their little boy to Prague; a private jet was put on standby ready to transfer him; he’s now in hospital there being assessed. A full review of the British authorities role in this whole sad affair has been ordered.

That’s what’s been reported. The picture is, of course, immensely more complicated than this, and we are not in possession of all the facts. We can’t be. But what I do know is that the doctors caring for Ashya have a solemn and binding duty of care for him; they couldn’t just shrug their shoulders and turn a blind eye when he vanished. They also have the advantage of objectivity and specialist knowledge. They will know, as the parents can’t, the real statistics relating to PBT; the range of emotions parents in these desperately difficult circumstances exhibit; the conflicts between maintaining confidentiality and defending their decisions; the tension between protecting the child and supporting the family; the real balance of risks and benefits in this particular situation.

My own issue is not with the tracking down of the family, but the aggressive way they were then treated. Surely everyone can understand the desperate wish to save the life of a beloved child; sometimes grieving and bewildered parents do take extreme action. I’ve witnessed such extreme reactions in my own professional life, I’ve read and heard of many more. It’s a feature of their frustration, despair, dread, powerlessness. Locking them up serves no useful function whatever. It merely adds to the distress of the little patient and his troubled brothers and sisters. And fuels a sense of injustice and mistrust. Who does that help?

 

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