Hazel McHaffie

e-books

Enough to warm the cockles

Back to work this week and finding plenty to warm the cockles of the heart. A quick share of the most pertinent before I get back to the big edit.

This handwritten sign appeared in a list of 21 pictures ‘to restore your faith in humanity‘:

During business hours the books on this porch are 50 cents. When the store is closed, please feel free to borrow them or keep them and pay me later. ANYTIME: IF YOU DON’T HAVE MONEY TO BUY BOOKS AND NEED OR WANT TO READ HELP YOURSELF. Donations accepted. 

Brilliant, huh?

And then there was the news that for the first time ever women have won all five Costa Book Awards.

And the statistics that show that people are buying more books in total thanks to aggressive marketing and the rise of e-books. All very salient points for me in my current deliberations.

Then there’s the tantalising pile of books I acquired myself this Christmas. IMG_8620

Who needs resolutions to feel positive at the start of 2013?

So, after a good wholesome break and lots of socialising, I’ve  returned to the isolation of my study, and to the current novel, with renewed enthusiasm and commitment. And a fresh eye. Exactly what was needed. The red pen is in overdrive.

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What price success?

With the launch of my latest novel in Edinburgh imminent (next Tuesday), my thinking has been tuned to all things literary. And I’ve just been interviewed by a lovely lady from The Evening News whose questions have made me remember all over again why I do what I do.

When your mind is in this groove it’s amazing how often stories about books crop up. Especially success stories.

In the news this week, for example, self-published crime-writer Kerry Wilkinson actually got a mention in The Telegraph. He’s just become the most popular e-book author on the Kindle Store, selling over 150,000 copies of his debut novel (NB. not the 250,000 the newspaper reported). No agent, no publicist either. That’s going some! He’s a sports journalist by background and he wrote Locked In as a challenge to himself apparently. He sold it for 98p and used online media to promote it. OK, I’m listening!

By contrast Sarah Winman had a massive publicity drive to kick-start her debut novel: When God was a Rabbit. When God was a RabbitThousands upon thousands of free copies were reportedly given away pre-publication (I can’t find the exact number now I want it) and that novel has gone on to win awards and accolades aplenty. Not my personal favourite read though, I must confess, but acclaimed by authors/reviewers whose opinion I respect.

Then there was Eva Rice, Sir Tim Rice‘s daughter, who’s currently writing her fourth novel. A report this week said she regretted publishing her first one at the age of 23, because it isn’t up to the standard of her later books. Nothing earth-shattering there. But I sympathise; I’ve disowned my first one too. And Ian Rankin once said that it’s because no book is ever perfect, that authors feel compelled to keep writing, striving for that goal.

And you’ve probably heard that 24 year-old Amanda Knox, imprisoned and tried for, and then acquitted of the brutal murder of her flatmate, Meredith Kercher, in 2007 in Perugia, has just signed a book deal with HarperCollins, allegedly worth £2.5 million. And she won’t even write it! (I daren’t even tell you the size of my advance, but you can be sure it’s nothing like that.)

Given that I’m seriously considering the best way forward for me now I’ve fulfilled my contracts with Luath Press, these stories all contribute to the decision making process. I think I’ve almost formulated a plan but I’m still open to persuasion.

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