Hazel McHaffie

heart transplant

A heartwarming sequel

Well, here it is: Independence Referendum Day up here in Scotland, but rest assured, I have no intention of writing about it. It’s been done to death already. Moving swiftly on …

As you know, much of my life has been spent grappling with difficult choices – not in politics, but in medicine – and blog posts on these issues aren’t always very cheery reading, so I’m delighted to bring you a fantastic story this week that’s sure to warm the cockles of your heart (whatever cockles are).

Hannah's ChoiceLast year I wrote a review about the book Hannah’s Choice on this blog. It tells the real life story of Hannah Jones who, aged just 13, hit the headlines back in 2008 and challenged the courts when she defied medical advice and chose not to have life-saving surgery. And what’s more her parents found the courage to let her.

But then, Hannah was no ordinary 13 year old; she had a wisdom and perspective borne of suffering. Painful medical interventions and sobering prognoses had been her lot from the tender age of 4 when she contracted leukaemia. And now, on the threshold of adolescence, sadly, her heart was seriously damaged and her organs were failing because of the toxic effects of her chemotherapy. The doctors said her only hope was in a heart transplant. But Hannah declined that option, choosing instead to go home and spend her days surrounded by the love of her family and friends. And she was allowed to make that decision. Wow! What a furore that stirred up!

As I reported on this blog, I was surprised and delighted when Hannah’s mum, Kirsty, responded to my review, and we’ve stayed in communication since. Why am I reiterating this? Because this week marks an amazing milestone.

Hannah starts at Aberystwyth University!

This is the same girl who went home to die. Except … she didn’t. Because a year later when her condition deteriorated she changed her mind and had a transplant, only this time the decision didn’t hit the front pages. Life, Hannah had discovered, was too precious to throw away. Those of us who review high profile cases in medical ethics are often limited to a brief period of time when the stories are newsworthy, and indeed I followed this case closely when Hannah was making her choices. But it’s really refreshing to get a longer term perspective. Especially one like this.

Huge thanks to both mum and daughter for giving me permission to share this news with you. I couldn’t be more happy for them. Cause for celebration indeed.A toast

In that same blog last year I mentioned my brother Rob, who also survived against the odds when he was treated for leukaemia and things went badly wrong. He wasn’t expected to see his 51st birthday. Fifteen years later he has just marked his own milestone: retiring from work aged 65. We celebrated with him a couple of weeks ago.

Here’s to them both and all those, who like them, challenge the rest of us to take stock and re-think our preconceived notions, beliefs and opinions.

 

 

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The plot thickens

Did you see the news a couple of weeks ago (11 April) about a three-year-old boy who has successfully survived a heart transplant after being kept alive artificially on a Berlin heart machine for 251 days – longer than any other child in Britain? Shortly after he was born, Joe Skerratt was diagnosed with cardiac myopathy – an enlarged and weakened heart. Initially he was treated with medication but when he deteriorated he needed the machine to take over the work of his failing heart. Amazing stuff.

These days my ears prick up as soon as I hear the words ‘transplant’ or ‘organ donation’. And as you know I’m ploughing through a stack of novels that include the subject in some guise or other. Time perhaps to bring you up to date with where I’m at with them, lest you start to suspect this blog is a smokescreen and I’m actually idling on some Caribbean beach. But first a caveat: some of the titles I’m going to mention I really really don’t recommend. I ploughed through them because I need to suss out the potential competition, but you can be more discriminating. (For a sense of my personal assessment shoot across to my Goodreads ratings and reviews.)

I’ve read all except four now and they seem to fall into three categories.

1. There are those that focus on families grappling with tragic circumstances and the impact of organ donation. (eg. Somewhere between Life and Death; One Perfect Day; In a Heartbeat; Stealing Kevin’s Heart; While my Sister Sleeps; Breath; The Household Guide to Dying.) Additional angles are used to provide a narrative thread – the recipients taking on the characteristics of the donor (cellular memory), or families searching for the donor’s identity for various reasons, or unexpected links between the two families. A number of these are geared towards young adults and tend to rather labour the importance of organ donation. And there’s a heavy religious agenda in some of the American ones.

2. Then there are the sci-fi novels, the futuristic and satirical takes on the issue. (eg. Never Let me Go; Heart Seizure; Little Boy Pig; The Samaritan; My Body, My Ashes.) The creation of ‘monsters’ comes into this group. The way-out and highly improbable. Unscrupulous scientists and doctors pushing the boundaries beyond what is ethical. Or mad chases against time and the odds.

3. And thirdly there are the mysteries and thrillers. (eg. Damaged; Blood Work; Coma; Dead Tomorrow; The Midwife’s Confession; Change of Heart.) Individuals and teams conspiring to obtain tissue or organs or indeed whole bodies for personal gain. Apparently this is a live issue in the USA.

I confess I got rather bored with so many books about a single subject. There isn’t much new to excite me in the facts and issues themselves. So the yawn-factor could well be distorting my perspective and judgement. However, analysing the stories is helping me to hone my own novel on this subject.

The first draft of (working title) Over my Dead Body consists of a plausible story centred around a relatively commonplace road traffic accident. But my reading has confirmed a hunch that it needs a second more compelling thread to keep the pages turning. So where do I go from here?

Introduce an element of sci-fi? Nope. Not my bag. Sci-fi can be technically fascinating, and I can admire the brains that project themselves into futuristic possibilities and challenge their readers to ask: Is this a world I would want to see or be part of? I too want to provoke thought and debate, but my personal preference is for the scenarios to be based more on today’s reality.

OK. A thriller then? Well, of all the books I’m most enjoying the medical thrillers with believable insights into the emotions and driving forces of those people caught up in the business of saving lives using transplanted organs. But I’m not sure I have what it takes to sustain this kind of pace, nor whether it would fit with my objectives.

Conclusion? I’m experimenting with an element of mystery and intrigue; weaving in a second more taut storyline of a dark secret that unravels gradually. I’m cautiously optimistic right at this moment but it could all change. It might not work. Or perhaps those last four books will revolutionise my thinking! Watch this space.

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